"Tawla does Andalucia" Dinner III

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TawlaDoesSmall-andalucia.png
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"Tawla does Andalucia" Dinner III

96.00

Thursday November 2, 6:30pm | The Tawla Cellar

To celebrate the rich history of the intricate spice routes and their impact on the regional cuisines that make up Tawla’s menu, we are excited to debut our “Tawla does _________.” Dinner Series this August. We will explore the ingredients and preparation techniques whose history is rooted in the Eastern Mediterranean countries that inspire our menu - Greece, Turkey, the Levant, and Iran - but are now mainstays in cuisines across Europe, Africa, and beyond. 

Tawla will highlight a specific region and dive into each region’s dishes and flavors through the Tawla lens. Known around the world as the symbol for community, dining, and coming together, the act of breaking bread will be key to each of these meals. As with Tawla’s house-made bread program, each dinner will revolve around a bread from that region in focus with Eastern Mediterranean roots. Every meal will be served in Tawla’s signature family-style format. 

October will shine a spotlight on Andalucia, the southern region of Spain! We could not have picked a better season to showcase the Moorish and Medieval Arabic influences on this region.  Tawla’s Executive Chef, Joseph Magidow, is incredibly knowledgeable in the rich histories of ingredients and preparation techniques and is excited to explore these flavors with you! 

Below is a preview of some of the dishes we'll be showcasing. 

Bread and accompaniments

COCA | savory flatbread, various toppings

This is a style of bread which takes many forms along the coastal areas of Spain depending on regional preferences. Like all Mediterranean flatbreads, it is most likely a descendant of Arab breads originating in the levant and bears a close resemblance to the modern lahmajoun in Turkey.

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BERENJANAS DE ALMAGRO | assorted vegetable escabeches

These small pickled eggplants are identical in preparation to makdous betinjan, a classic stuffed and fermented eggplant preparation originating in Syria. Today it is considered one of the hallmarks of Arab eggplant cookery, which is no small honor. The Spanish version is important enough to have achieved Protected Origin status for several of its producers.

While today escabeche is most closely associated with Spanish cuisine, the technique and name both originate in sikbaj, a Persian method of preparing meat or fish in a sweet and sour sauce. It is also closely related to zeytinyagli, a Turkish method of poaching an ingredient in a mixture of olive oil and lemon juice.

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LA FIDEUA | vermicelli, saffron, mussels, chorizo

This single dish encapsulates simultaneously various Arab contributions to the cuisine and agriculture of Spain as well as the subtle evolution of those influences over time. Pasta is made with hard wheat, which was not known in Europe until introduction by the Arabs in Spain and Sicily. It is also flavored with saffron, perhaps the most iconic example of an ingredient which started in the eastern Mediterranean but has become so important in its new home that the easiest saffron to find in stores is Spanish. Furthermore, this dish is a modern innovation where the pasta is being cooked in the style of rice, another imported product which forms the backbone of this dish’s ancestor, the famous paella.

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COCIDO ANDALUZ | chickpea stew, pork trotter, morcilla, herbs

A rustic stew of meat, vegetables, and legumes is the great unifier of all Mediterranean cuisine, and this one is no exception. Its nearest modern relatives are adafina, a Sabbath dish from the Sephardic tradition, and tafina, a North African version. The modern cocido is the result of the lamb and goat stews of the Moors being transformed by the Spanish inquisition which required the addition of pork as proof of the cook’s Catholic bonafides.

The experience wouldn't be complete without Wine Director Christina Sanger pairing wines from our cellar that go perfectly with every bite!

Tickets are $96 per person (includes service and tax). Space is very limited. Tickets are non-refundable.

** The menu may have some slight changes because our farmer friends and California may bring us some different things the day of the event!

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